Saturday, October 25, 2008

I Want One: Fluorescent Cat

It's difficult to test if a particular genetic change has achieved its intended result if you're not sure whether the gene is even expressing in the first place, so genetic medicine researchers need a clearly verifiable way to determine when introduced genetic material is actually expressing properly. They seem to have found it in a jellyfish gene that codes for the production of a fluorescent protein, which has been successfully introduced into a perfectly healthy (and seriously spooky-awesome) cat named Mr. Green Genes.


If they can make a cat glow in the dark, how long until they can engineer one to be hypo-allergenic?

5 comments:

elephantschild said...

Yup. This one's going to scare the daylights out of Mom.

The Rebellious Pastor's Wife said...

Well, they started out with the flourescent mice (I saw them in my kid's Guinness Book of World Records)...so they needed a flourescent cat to catch them all...

This would really freak me out if I woke up to that laying on my chest in the middle of the night. A real cat is bad enough

Severian2500 said...

www.allerca.com

elephantschild said...

Bu think how easy it would be to pick up cat hair - you'd just need a black-light equipped Roomba.

Evan said...

That's awesome, dude. Too bad they're $8,000.

That's like 10 times the cost of a (cat-)lifetime supply of Claritin, which would also reduce my other allergies.